Florida Breast Cancer Foundation

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Please note:

The Florida Breast Cancer Foundation (FBCF) is legally prohibited from participating in political campaigns at any level. FBCF could lose its tax-exempt status or be subject to federal excise taxes if FBCF or individuals while representing FBCF participate in candidates’ political campaigns. (See the IRS article below.) Of course, advocates and supporters can engage in any political activity of their choosing as private citizens, but it is important that FBCF is not referenced or used when individuals do this on their own. If you have any questions about this, please do not hesitate to contact me. Thank you for your understanding, your cooperation, and your support of FBCF. Remember Together we WILL end breast cancer!

http://www.irs.gov/charities/charitable/article/0,,id=163395,00.html

 

The Restriction of Political Campaign Intervention by Section 501(c)(3) Tax-Exempt Organizations

Under the Internal Revenue Code, all section 501(c)(3) organizations are absolutely prohibited from directly or indirectly participating in, or intervening in, any political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) any candidate for elective public office. Contributions to political campaign funds or public statements of position (verbal or written) made on behalf of the organization in favor of or in opposition to any candidate for public office clearly violate the prohibition against political campaign activity. Violating this prohibition may result in denial or revocation of tax-exempt status and the imposition of certain excise taxes. Certain activities or expenditures may not be prohibited depending on the facts and circumstances. For example, certain voter education activities (including presenting public forums and publishing voter education guides) conducted in a non-partisan manner do not constitute prohibited political campaign activity. In addition, other activities intended to encourage people to participate in the electoral process, such as voter registration and get-out-the-vote drives, would not be prohibited political campaign activity if conducted in a non-partisan manner. On the other hand, voter education or registration activities with evidence of bias that (a) would favor one candidate over another; (b) oppose a candidate in some manner; or (c) have the effect of favoring a candidate or group of candidates, will constitute prohibited participation or intervention.

The Internal Revenue Service provides resources to exempt organizations and the public to help them understand the prohibition. As part of its examination program, the IRS also monitors whether organizations are complying with the prohibition.